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for something fun and educational to do together. nature spot quest is our spot. opened in march 2011 with more than 7,000 square feet of interactive educational things to do and see, the exhibit has the feel of a playground and the educational tools of classroom. every nook and cranny offers children a new adventure. unlike traditional museums, at naturequest children are challenged from self-discovery to explore and be curious in a hands-on environment just like real scientists. with over 100 interactive encounters to choose from, a few of my son's favorites include the clubhouse build in the trees and human fossils and the simulating river that seems to be swimming when they step on it. >> naturequest is this amazingly fun world that's scientifically lis tick. you can explore from the oceans and top of the mountains and everywhere you look there's something to do, something to find. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? >> not much, but my son has so much fun exploring he doesn't lielz his little brain is working too. ann clair stapleton, cnn, atlanta. [ male announcer ] when it come
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
the european union. despite anti-discrimination laws, they have little access to education or public services in several european countries. >> we need more than just words from the e you. brussels can launch proceedings over treaty violations and holds member states to account this way and other areas, but so far, not over discrimination a menorahs. >> amnesty international nevertheless concludes that the you deserves the nobel peace prize for its peace-building policies over the past six decades. >> the very last issue of the financial times coach lynn hit the stands today with a bit of humor. >> gallows humor, that is. the front page carried the headline "finally in the black" and it was called "the final time storage line." >> but the business side has been no laughing matter. a direct losses every year since it started publication back in 2000. and finally in the black -- an ironic reference to the fact that in its entire 13-year history, "the financial times to richland" never made a profit. >> we did not have a chance to build up our readership over decades. whoever enters the market l
can see that the situation is actually worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti missi here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of enrenched poverty. many o these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national pri
phones and tablets including everything from instructive or educational materials to games. children of all ages, armed with these devices, are using apps and raising concerns over privacy. federal trade commission is now investigating whether companies that make apps are violating the privacy rights of children by collecting personal data from mobile devices and sharing it with advertisers and data banks. these types of apps can detail a child's physical location or phone numbers of their friends along with other information. yesterday the f.t.c. issued a new report documenting those concerns. it found among 400apps designed for kids most failed to inform parents about the types of data that could be gathered and who would access it. the co-editor of the collaborative web blog boing boing and a father who uses and closely watches apps for kids. we talked via laptop. >> your phone as a unique i.d., and so that i.d. could be passed to third party ad networks that are advertising on other apps so they can follow you from app to app and build a file on the kinds of things that you're do
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
reform. >> rose: right. >> i think really looking at regulatory structures, educational structures, things like that. >> rose: but that costs money. >> i needs to be revisited. the look, i think we've got to get kind of the $4 trillion thing behind us and then -- but it's not like the government shouldn't invest in anything one of the things that has come out of every jobs council i've been a part of that is almost universal until the b.r.t. is that that thisntoury needs to invest in infrastructure. this is something that the president and the b.r.t., jobs councils, all agree but it runs into problems because what's -- the funding structure going to be? how do we pay for it and things like that? >> rose: that's the potential for growth and growth is the essential thing. build the infrastructure, build the education. >> anybody doesn't that doesn't think once we do this four trillion dollar down payment that growth isn't the most important thing is crazy. so that's what we have to be looking at for broader tax reform. >> rose: and simpson-bowles is a good guideline? >> i think simps
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine, could you be mine ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! today is fruit picking day! i hope we get to pick strawberries. do you like strawberries? they are my favorite fruit. - hi, daniel! are you excited to pick fruit for the whole neighborhood? - yes! i can't wait! - me neither. - hi, trolley! - hello, trolley. he
to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. dependent on the government and aid agencies for basic sup
with the education of little kids teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions for this to work, and it can't happen overnight. so as i said, part of the problem is they've created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> you expressed some pessimism or realism about what's likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops that'll be back, essentially, to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that which is islamist, which is semi-democratic but with the emphasis on the semi and, of course, is nuclear armed? >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. and i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them, there will be circumstances where some nuance and potential compromise is required, then you approach all of these problems that way. if you have very good intell
' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video clip] >> we must dust ourselves off and begin the work of remaking america. [applause] everywhere we look, there is work to be done. the state of our economy calls for action bold and swift. we will react to lay a new foundation for growth. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what t
. of course, rhino horn is ending up oftentimes as a form of traditional medicine, so part is about educating buyers, educating individuals to be more sophisticated in understanding there's no scientific basis for rhino horns being a medicinal cure for anything at all. also, understanding that the trade is international. here in los angeles it's a major hub for the trade in rhino horn. illegal crime syndicates, it supports militias and destabilizes nations. it's both an issue at the source. it's a consumer education awareness. if there's no demand there's no supply. we all need to come together. >> phillippe, what can we do, just as normal folks, everyday people if we want to stop something like this? >> well, as i said, it's a big consumer issue. what will surprise many people to know is that the united states is probably the second largest destination for illegal wildlife products, tigers, ivory, rhino horn. in many cases there are even websites here in the united states that cater, fashion websites, antique websites that cater to the illegal ivory trade, for example. lots of rhino horn her
see education, energy efficiency, access to global markets, the attraction of immigrant entrepreneurs, and other factors as national security issues. my own view is that the fundamentals of american society still offer us the best hand to play in global competitiveness. no other country can match the quality and variety of our post-secondary education. we have the broadest scientific and technological base and the most advanced agricultural system. our population is younger and more mobile than most other industrialized nations. we still can flourish in this global marketplace if we nurture the competitive genius of the american people that has allowed us time and time again to reinvent our economy. but we must deal with failures of governance that have delayed resolutions to obvious problems. no rational strategy for our long-term growth and security should fail to restrain current entitlement spending. and no attempt to gain the maximum strategic advantage from our human resource potential should fail to enact comprehensive immigration reform. that resolves the status of undocumente
poverty. highlighting things like education are a path laid to burning the right to be heard. because a lot of communities are saying we just don't believe that you care about us. i think that having folks who communicate well is a ticket to making that hard battle happen. greg: i read his books and offense. your latest one, you revert to the republican party as hard wing conservatives. that they are being pushed into political relevance. >> yes, for example, the fight over the fiscal cliff is taking place between speaker boehner and the white house. they put republicans in the senate in a rare type of position where they are in the game, but they are not the leaders of the game. see what is going on in the senate in general. we're republicans should have the majority of the senate, if not highly ontological candidates were nominated by the party base. thinking of someone like richard murdoch in indiana. there's no reason the democrats should not hold that seat. they are putting republicans in the senate at a disadvantage. >> the other thing is that ted cruz is a tea party candidate,
on drugs, they say look, we spend more on drug education and treatment than they do on law enforcement. what could they do better? >> what they could do better is simply stop locking people up. if you are sent to prison, you end up in far worse state than if you were actually sent to a drug rehabilitation center and helped. >> you're known as such a free spirit, right? do you smoke marijuana? >> i'm a '60s lad. i tried a split or two when i was a teenager. i decided that drink was my drug of choice, and so i prefer white wine or beer to marijuana, but you know, whether children of mine do, we'll, that's another story. >> i'm sure, right, they're in the age where i suppose it can be. all right, well, thank you very much. really appreciate your time. >> cheers, thank you. >> pretty interesting and serious topic, although he did say afterwards that he would want to try pot brownies. breaking the taboo will be able on youtube this evening and his opinion is on cnn.com/opinion right now and it is amazing. some of the statistics are unforgettable. >>> up next, mohammed morsi addresses suppor
that are guesswork, conjecture, educated guesswork to be sure, but still, they're conjecture. it's not like a court of law where you say this is the evidence, this is irrefutable proof. on the other hand there are certain things that the intelligence community can do. for example, they can assess how stockpiles were accumulated in a particular country. you mentioned that the russians had supplied some chemical agents to the syrians and that's absolutely true. you can assess how each area supplies the syrians. you know what they've done, how they've done it and how often they do it. also you can have some intelligence sometimes from human sources that specifically outlines exactly, you know, how good the chemical weapons are, whether they'll be used, whether there's good training for it, what kind of training these people have and all of that is weighed in when they make their assessment. >> there are reports that the assad regime has loaded the chemical weapons onto missiles. you need to get between assad and the person that pushes the button on the missile. how do we know that? >> there are report
.s. not necessarily people, but the education, the ability to produce them. >> that is sad, how do we get it back? >> well, it is a concerted effort to get it back, this project i talked about where we do a mac next year, i think this is a really good other step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. so it is not a matter of bringing it back, it is a matter of starting it here. >> while the announcement of a made in usa line of macs is welcome news, the new samsung ad campaign is not good news for apple. it is bold and damaging. >> hey, thanks. >> you guys have fun. >> home by midnight. >> the next big thing is already here, samsung galaxy x 3. >> the unmistakable message there, apple products are for your presidents, samsung makes the really cool stuff. >> they came along and tried to paint the those with white ear bugs apple users as losers. they're trying to paint their product as cool and yours as not cool. is this war? >> well, we love our customers and we'll fight to defend them with anyone. is it thermonuclear war? the fact is we love competition at apple. we wan
and build an education center there. 46 people flying on september 11th from newark, newark, to san francisco were killed when flight 93 crashed in that field. the families say they're hoping for a boost from private donors including fortune 500 companies. >> i feel nothing but peace when i'm at the site, when i'm stand oughted sacred ground. >> 450,000 people have already visited the memorial. >>> has our obsession with cell phones risen to the level of an addiction? some researchers say yes. they say factors such as materialism and impulsiveness play a big role in tipping cell phone use into an addiction especially when phones are used excessively in public. that's when we're signaling that we have a shiny object, status symbol. young adults check their phones an average of 60 times a day. >>> new details about the kansas city chiefs player who killed his girlfriend and then committed suicide. among other things, police are now saying that he may have had another girlfriend. jovan belcher shot the mother of his daughter at their home early in the morning and today we learned that
into education, into science, into infrastructure as well and he'll be talking about the infrastructure initiatives including more must be for small to medium size businesses, more money for power stations as well. but it really looks like he's got very little room for maneuver. the opposition, he'll get that and say this is your fault, these are your policies. mr. osbourne will turn around and say look what's turning around you. look what's going on in the financial sector. look what's going on in the eurozone as well where unemployment is actually on the surface much worse than it is in the united kingdom. so it's going to be the usual ding dong battle of theatre. but i doubt we'll see many new initiatives that haven't been leaked already, ross. >> yeah, you only have to read the papers today and everything seems to be in there. i think you've done a very good two and a half-minute analysis of everything we might get. well-done. we'll come back to you later. get a cup of coffee, stay warm. julian joins us with his own thoughts. steve got into all the details. he's laid it all out for
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
. >> this is where i disagree. >> he's one of the most educated men ever, and we're still questioning whether he's born in the country. >> here's the thing. we actually haven't had a conversation about race, and that's where i disagree with you. because a conversation about race is something that happens outside of the dog whistle attacks. both sides -- either side, no side, throw it all off. we were called a nation of cow yards by eric holder. the president had a moment with professor gates. he had all these times when he could have led on the issue. regardless of color, any president has that opportunity. he had greater opportunity. instead he used it. >> sean: we'll put you all back in chains? >> was that not an opportunity to talk about chains when he invited the police officer? >> that was a photo op. the real opportunity would have been -- in his own words, he said i don't know exactly what happened, but the police acted irresponsibly. that's not leadership. that is putting something in a context where you can use it for a narrative. >> sean: our own vice-president used it in this election
paying deficit while still investing in education and research that are important to growing our economy and if we are serious about protecting middle class families then we are going to have to ask the wettiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> higher tax rate, of course, at issue and whether or not as republicans had hoped they could just close loopholes and tax deductions and that could. >> he keep say the wealthiest americans but $250,000 that's not the wealthest of america. >> right. so there was some word during the campaign when joe biden let slip that $1 million would be the threshold for which they would begin to tax the wealthest americans. marco rubio on a saturday morning addressed as well. they are going after each other. senator marco rubio and president obama in these dueling addresses. >> we must get the national debt under control. taxes will not solve our 16 trillion-dollar debt. only economic growth and form of entitlement programs will control the debt. woe must reform the job killing tax code by getting rid of unjustif
icbm missile tests. i thought that maybe, because he was educated in switzerland, because he speaks english, new leader, seemed comfortable with his people, that he might go in a new direction. he will be following his father and the bellicose attitude they have had. it looks like it, anyway, but the question is, what do we do about it? that is the key. >>shepard: we have 40,000 dead people in syria and we can't do anything about that. why do we thing we can do anything about north korea. we can't. >>guest: we have tried sanctions. we have tried dialogue. we have tried a number of policies. what we need is, number one, we cannot always say that it is up to china. china has leverage over them. they don't dictate. what we need is a new approach. in the new six-party talk countries, involving russia, china, south korea, the united states, japan, and i don't know exactly what that is. but it is a combination of toughening the policy with some kind of rewards if there is movement, a positive movement. we have never really tested this guy. we know very little about him. so, i'm not saying
, whether paper orwhat not has to be compostable. that is education we have to have. dig out a phone book from the '70s hasn't been turned not compostable of anything, paper or otherwise has to be. you're using an argument that people used against styrofoam, big mac and whopper containers. it will cost more money. it wl put the guys out of business. they were all over your streets it back in the early 80s and '90s those coanies have done very well. i know you put up the bag and say, you hold up the bag and say you love the bag. someone doing that with styrofoam containers 15 or 20 years ago melissa: hang on i have to get a few words in here too. this is disagree with me. >> goahead. melissa: takes 91% more energy to recycle paper bag than plastic bag. i worry about that. so much easier to recycle bags. every store i go into the new york, when you walk to the front door to your left a full container has bags when people brought back. when i bring back a plalastic back i use it deat i don't buy bags for trash bins in my house. i use this. not like people take them and throw them away. gohe
is research and education campaign to insure that the people that are under the influence of any drug do not get behind the wheel. melissa: now that you're legalizing it in places the use will grow. so the incidence will grow and we have a lot more area to test what could possibly happen. that makes me nervous as a driver. rebecca, i will give you last word. >> 10,800 people killed drinking and driving. 40,000 people died because of alcohol. 400,000 died because of smoking. the numbers for marijuana are incredibly low. you can't overdose. you don't get cancer from it. and i --. melissa: i hear you, rebecca. we don't want to add to any of those numbers. one more [raul talking at once]. we've got to leave it there. thanks to our pot power panel. you were all fantastic. hope you come back. >>> bizarre warnings from syria's regime. they claim it could be framed for using chemical weapons. there are unconfirmed reports their use may have already begun. we'll talk about that next. >>> this made i grateful riding in a chrysler, right? remember the workers that were caught boozing and looked lik
the possibility of democrats, who were doing things based on conservative ideas in the area of education, welfare, medicaid and so forth, and take all of that and elevate it and publicize it. his background, really, is in marketing. he ran a marketing company before politics, and he admits quite frankly that in the last election the conservative movement really didn't do an adequate job of explaning its ideas contributing to the losses nay took in the last election. >> senator demint had a great relationship with the tea party groups. what's that mean for the groups with the senator moving to ahead heritage? >> i think it means, bill, that he may try to take them to the next level. no one would dispute, i don't think, that the tea party has, schal we say, communication problems, and if their basic idea was to reduce the level of public spend k and in the states, i think that using the force of the analysis that senator demint and analysts at harming have at their di poe sal is there is the pos protect of the conservative movement becoming more understanding to the largely public. what can you tal
d from the university of chicago. that's how it happened. it was like 10 guys. i miss 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you know you mentioned the justice component of a lot of islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is response to the corruption of these u.s. sponsored regimes and in the case of gaza, which he mentioned was a very serious component. any thoughts on how to combat that were placed in the right direction? >> for the record, i am against corruption. i just wanted to clear that up. yes, look, it goes back to the point i thought i made in my remarks that islamists didn't win. i'm not islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose they screwing up the delivery of services. in this by being so corrupt. they lose and islamists are there like they've been for 80 years, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity through violence or nonviolence. we didn't even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, wh
say the american taxpayer helps subsidize their education because many of them receive world-class training at our public and private colleges and universities, and then reluctantly return home to pursue their careers because they can't get a visa or can't get a green card here in america. we are cultivating human capital and then sending those individuals back home. now, this is an area where there is broad, broad support. my colleague, senator moran, recently wrote a letter, had a "dear colleague" letter which points out that roughly -- well, he cites in the letter that more than three-quarters of voters support a stem-type visa. he quotes in this letter, dated july 20, 2012, "87% of democrats polled, 72% of republicans polled and 65% of independents support the creation of a stem visa." and, of course, if you think about it, it's just common sense. why in the world would we want to subsidize the education of these students from other countries, train them in these highly specialized and highly desirable fields and then simply send them home? i've introduced legislation ove
of it is of their own making. you cannot start with the education of the kids, teaching them to aid israel and everything it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions . it can't happen overnight. so does the central part of the problem is they created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of reasonable deal. >> expressed some pessimism or realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. there will be back, a senseless, to where it was before september 11th. what happens in pakistan after that? democratic, emphasis on semi. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them there will be circumstances for some nuance and potential compromise has required, then you approached all of these problems the way. you have very good intelligence. you can understand what is going on with in
people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty product just as much. >> how are you not steve jobs? >> in many ways, one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden that would've normally existed is he told me on a couple of occasions before he passed away to never question what he would've done. never ask the question what he would do, to just do what's right. >> brian williams' conversation w
investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >> shepard: that one time on the run software mogul john mcafee was reportedly going back to belize to face questions about the death of one of his neighbors. he is in the hospital after reportedly suffering convulsions or heart attacks or chest pains depending on whom you are listening to while he was in custody. in any case, it is a strange and new turn in what is already an extraordinary saga. john mcafee is the millionaire many times over founder of the antivirus company that bears his name, mcafee. and his troubles really started last month back in belize. you see a neighbor complained about mcafee's dogs. then somebody poisoned those dogs. and then somebody killed the complaining neighbor. see how that works? didn't look good for mcafee. >> it was a cob convenient thing. the next door neighbor got killed. now we can do something, we can blame him. >> shepard: police in belize have called mcafee a person of interest in his neighbor
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